America’s Public Housing, As Told By Those Who Live There


“The story of public housing has been engulfed by stereotypes and misconceptions. Facts have been distorted. Nuance has been lost. Residents’ real-life accounts have been reduced to tropes of exceptionalism or tragedy—or forgotten altogether.”

Adi Talwar

The Hope Gardens NYCHA development in Bushwick.

Many people believe they understand public housing in America. Most of them are massively wrong.

That’s because the story of public housing has been engulfed by stereotypes and misconceptions. Facts have been distorted. Nuance has been lost. Residents’ real-life accounts have been reduced to tropes of exceptionalism or tragedy—or forgotten altogether.

The prevailing cultural narrative is that public housing is and was only for poor people of color, specifically Black people. There are also reasons for that narrative. Public housing became predominantly inhabited by Black people in the United States mainly due to the long lingering economic and social impact of the injustice of slavery, the racist federal housing policies that re-inscribed segregation, redlining and unfair banking practices, and Jim Crow policies. In reality, more than 10 million US residents of various racial and ethnic backgrounds have lived in public housing over the past century. And now, they’re pushing back.

Current and former public housing residents are coalescing to tell their own stories, in their own words, through the National Public Housing Museum in Chicago. While the NPHM is based in the Midwest, it features stories of public housing residents from across the country, including several voices from New York. The NPHM is the first cultural institution in the United States dedicated to interpreting and contextualizing the American experience in public housing.

Using oral histories, art and artifacts, the museum will archive and share public housing stories of hope and personal achievement, as well as tales of resistance and resilience. The goal is to dispel lingering falsehoods and change the narrative about public housing while fostering deeper understanding about who this housing serves and why it matters.

!function(f,b,e,v,n,t,s)
{if(f.fbq)return;n=f.fbq=function(){n.callMethod?
n.callMethod.apply(n,arguments):n.queue.push(arguments)};
if(!f._fbq)f._fbq=n;n.push=n;n.loaded=!0;n.version=’2.0’;
n.queue=[];t=b.createElement(e);t.async=!0;
t.src=v;s=b.getElementsByTagName(e)[0];
s.parentNode.insertBefore(t,s)}(window, document,’script’,
‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js’);
fbq(‘init’, ‘1406141213192673’);
fbq(‘track’, ‘PageView’);



Source link

admin

Leave a Reply